Wednesday, May 18, 2011

Le Trou Normand......A Palate Cleanser Between Courses

My good friends today I would like to share with you something very elegant,  a certain savoir vivre or etiquette, of rich dining. By rich I mean in calories and, if I may add, sumptuous.
It all began in Normandy.  People in this region of France eat heavy meals with cream since this is the most common ingredient in most of their meals. Therefore a glass of Calvados, an apple brandy made in the area of Calvados in Normandy, is usually imperative between courses in order to digest the previous course until you "attack" the next.


File:Couperne Calvados.jpg
Courtesy Of Wikipedia On Google
This custom was generalized in France and in the rest of the world in chic restaurants and in homes when the meal is rather heavy. This custom however did not stop at just drinking straight Calvados but it was extended to the preparation of a Sherbet (Sorbet) usually made with either green apples and Calvados, or Lemon or Lime (or both) with Vodka, or what ever could "Cleanse the palate between courses".
I would like to share with you today a recipe I usually make when rather rich creamy courses are being served. It is a " Vodka - Lime Sherbet " but with no dairy in it. It should be very fresh and cold like ice-cream. This re-organizes your appetite to be able to eat more food!!

File:Backyard limes.jpg
Lime
Courtesy Of Wikipedia
Lemon
Courtesy Of Wikipedia
You will need:
Serves 15 little shots.
-  Grated zest from 6 limes.
-  1 cup lime juice.
-  135 gms of powdered sugar.
-  3 cups cold water if you do not want it alcoholic or if you do then you add,
-  2 cups cold water and 1 cup Vodka.
Method: 
-  Mix together the rind of the 6 limes, 1 cup of lime juice, and 135 gms. of powdered sugar in a saucepan and bring to a boil,  then simmer for 10 minutes till the solution becomes thick and syropy.
-  Let cool completely.
-  Add the 2 cups of cold water, stir well, then add the 1 cup of vodka and stir well.
-  Freeze in little shot glasses for at least 24 hours. It is usually served before the third course.
Enjoy!
Stelio
Read more: http://www.blogdoctor.me/2007/02/expandable-post-summaries.html#ixzz1QI9F1mh2